Christine Chin Gallery Write-up

Christine Chin: Sentient Kitchen

Christine Chin presented her own set of works called Sentient Kitchen: Fleshy Kitchen Accessories on Thursday October 23rd, 2014 in the Llewelyn Gallery. Her exhibit consisted of sculptures, photos, and videos that explored the convergence between technology and biology. This being most were household items that were combined with human body parts to create “sentient” works.

Some of these works were, Sensitive Salter, Tasting Spoons, Good Listener, and Breast Bottles. They all were made of real household objects with silicone modeling and oil based clay to make the body parts. She also used clever descriptions for the “products” that she made, using humor in their titles. These try to show the combination of biology and technology, which can show how useful humans can be for certain actions. For instance the breast bottles show that body parts will be a lot more useful and practical that normal bottles. Also how these things cannot be reproduced in tech.

These works to me give me an odd feeling. They all make you really think about what they are and their purpose for being created, like the spoons in Tasting Spoons. They have tongues on the end instead of metal, which a first will seem just odd and silly, but after a while can really make a strange impact on some. For me, it showed that certain people have different tastes when it comes to spoons, so it’s like a play on words almost. The human elements in this also help make the objects have sentience to them in a way. Like if you touched them they might have some sort of reaction to it.

In conclusion, this exhibit was quite interesting altogether. All of the human elements in each work gave them all a sort of connection to us. These kinds of things cannot be replicated in any sort of efficient way, but it still gives us a very close example of what they might look like, and that is what makes them all so unique.

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